not rare


  1. theparisreview:

The Baffler has made all of its back issues available for free online. Here are our recommendations.

    theparisreview:

    The Baffler has made all of its back issues available for free online. Here are our recommendations.

  2. menterart:

    The Intellect Devourer.

    This is definitely one of my favorite D&D creatures, and I really enjoyed making my own rendition of it. I included some color variations inspired by various iconic illustrations of the same beast.

  3. And Lot’s wife, of course, was told not to look back where all those people and their homes had been. But she did look back, and I love her for that, because it was so human. So she was turned into a pillar of salt. So it goes.
    Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five (via likeafieldmouse)
  4. discardingimages:

firefox fish
'Hours of Joanna the Mad', Bruges 1486-1506.
BL, Add 18852, fol. 89r

    discardingimages:

    firefox fish

    'Hours of Joanna the Mad', Bruges 1486-1506.

    BL, Add 18852, fol. 89r

  5. ☛ A collection of sketches on OpenProcessing by Diana Lange used for teaching Processing.

    p5art:

    A real treasure trove! :) From total beginner to more advanced.

    (via fyprocessing)

  6. discardingimages:

rabbit riding a hound with a trained snail of prey Pontifical of Guillaume Durand, Avignon, before 1390.
Paris, Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, ms. 143, fol. 165r

    discardingimages:

    rabbit riding a hound with a trained snail of prey 

    Pontifical of Guillaume Durand, Avignon, before 1390.

    Paris, Bibliothèque Sainte-Geneviève, ms. 143, fol. 165r

  7. discardingimages:

nice hat. or collar… Luttrell Psalter, England ca. 1325-1340 (British Library, Add 42130, fol. 212r)

    discardingimages:

    nice hat. or collar… 

    Luttrell Psalter, England ca. 1325-1340 (British Library, Add 42130, fol. 212r)

  8. discardingimages:

horned pegasusThomas of Cantimpré, Liber de natura rerum, France ca. 1290.
Valenciennes, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 320, fol. 76v

Dead ringer for a Peryton.

    discardingimages:

    horned pegasus

    Thomas of Cantimpré, Liber de natura rerum, France ca. 1290.

    Valenciennes, Bibliothèque municipale, ms. 320, fol. 76v

    Dead ringer for a Peryton.

  9. midcenturymodernfreak:

    Gerry Anderson’s Captain Scarlet Vs. The Mysterons - Via

    (via notpulpcovers)

  10. likeafieldmouse:

    Jim Mangan - Time of Nothing - The Great Salt Lake, Utah

  11. likeafieldmouse:

Olafur Eliasson - Your Watercolor Machine (2009)

    likeafieldmouse:

    Olafur Eliasson - Your Watercolor Machine (2009)

  12. heatherwpetty:

    thaurantiell:

    65 wonderfully cozy reading nooks for book lovers

    How many nooks are too many for one house to have, exactly? Because I would take one of each, please. 

  13. ewilloughby:


Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.
The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.
Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”
—
Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.
Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

    ewilloughby:

    Changyuraptor yangi is a newly-described microraptorine dromaeosaur dinosaur from the early Cretaceous (Yixian formation) of Liaoning, China.

    The animal would have been around 4 feet long in life, and its fossil shows that it was covered in feathers — including, as in its smaller cousin Microraptor, a pair of “leg wings” represented by long paired pennaceous feathers on the metatarsals and tibiotarsus. One of Changyuraptor's most unique features is its voluminous tail feathers, and these feathers constitute the longest of any known non-avian dinosaur, with the most distal retrices reaching around 30 cm in length.

    Changyuraptor is also by far the largest “four-winged” dinosaur known, and while this might not be as big of a deal as it sounds (given that there aren’t very many “four-winged” dinosaurs), it does show that small size wasn’t necessarily the gatekeeper to certain volant adaptations. I personally doubt that this animal was doing anything approaching powered flight, but the long tail feathers and multiple sets of long, well-developed lifting surfaces may have been a boon to gliding and controlled descent. The exceptionally long tail feathers therefore might have been used as a sort of “pitch control” device, wherein a large, relatively heavy animal would have needed especially fine-tuned control over rapid falls onto prey or in safe landings from higher ground. As Buzz Lightyear would say, “This isn’t flying, it’s falling with style!”

    Gouache paint on A3-size hot-pressed illustration board, approx. 5-6 hours.

    Gang Han et al. 2014. “A new raptorial dinosaur with exceptionally long feathering provides insights into dromaeosaurid flight performance”. Nature Communications. 5: 4382.

    (via rhamphotheca)

  14. foxmouth:

    Landscape Portraits, 2013 | Anna Ådén

    (via viscousplatypus)